Links van 18 februari 2015 tot 23 februari 2015

The Trouble with Dijsselbloem | Jacobin
For Dijsselbloem, extinguishing Syriza’s promise is imperative. It is a precondition for restoring the stability of the EU that he, his party, and economic elites so desire. But it is as necessary for the continuation of the dreamless, managerial, suit-and-tie progressivism from which he has never strayed.

The dangers of the “Google Analytics-powered Startup”
Let me start off by saying that I am not advocating for people not to use Google Analytics; in fact I use it avidly and consider myself a big fan. With this post, my mission is rather to provide a bit of perspective for the many current and prospective startup founders out there who base (or intend to base) their ‘data-driven work style’ on Google Analytics alone. In my world, Google Analytics should be seen as one advisor of many rather than ‘the one truth’, and here’s a few reasons for that:

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Greece Should Not Give In to Germany’s Bullying | Foreign Policy
Had the Varoufakis plan been put forward by an investment banker, it would have been perceived as perfectly reasonable. Yet in the parallel universe inhabited by Germany’s Finance Minister Wolfgang Schäuble, such demands are seen as “irresponsible”: Greece must be bled dry to service its foreign creditors in the name of European solidarity.

Yanis Varoufakis: How I became an erratic Marxist | News | The Guardian
A Greek or a Portuguese or an Italian exit from the eurozone would soon lead to a fragmentation of European capitalism, yielding a seriously recessionary surplus region east of the Rhine and north of the Alps, while the rest of Europe is would be in the grip of vicious stagflation. Who do you think would benefit from this development? A progressive left, that will rise Phoenix-like from the ashes of Europe’s public institutions? Or the Golden Dawn Nazis, the assorted neofascists, the xenophobes and the spivs? I have absolutely no doubt as to which of the two will do best from a disintegration of the eurozone.

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