Links van 17 mei 2015 tot 26 mei 2015

Tanith Lee, 1947-2015 | Tor.com
Ugh. Nog een stuk jeugd verdwenen. — "We are saddened to report the passing of science fiction, fantasy, and horror writer Tanith Lee. Lee had a long and prolific writing career, publishing over 90 books and 300 short stories, as well as several poems, four BBC Radio plays, and two episodes of the BBC’s sci-fi television series Blake’s 7."

‘Mattress Girl’ Is a Perfect Icon for the Feminist Left | National Review Online
The continued lionization of Sulkowicz has proven so instructive: It has made clear how utterly uninterested the feminist movement is in anything like an appeal to facts or common reason.

Welcome to Ordos, China: The World’s Largest “Ghost City” | The Bohemian Blog
Built for over a million people, the city of Ordos was designed to be the crowning glory of Inner Mongolia. Doomed to incompletion however, this futuristic metropolis now rises empty out of the deserts of northern China. Only 2% of its buildings were ever filled; the rest has largely been left to decay, abandoned mid-construction, earning Ordos the title of China’s Ghost City. Last year I travelled to Inner Mongolia for myself, to get a closer look at the bizarre, ghost metropolis of Ordos… and the experience, as I would discover, was far stranger than anything I could have prepared for.

Secret’s collapse shows the traditional VC funding model is broken | VentureBeat | Entrepreneur | by Jenny Q. Ta, Sqeeqee
The monumental failure of anonymous social app Secret and the closing of the company’s doors after a mere 16 months in business has fueled serious discussion among entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. Concerned parties on both sides of the funding table are asking hard questions about what this development means to the future of venture capital funding and whether the well-funded startup’s demise might not in fact indicate that the traditional VC model is broken and badly in need of repair.

Solving Sudoku with SQL – Database tutorial – developer Fusion
I embarked on an exercise to write a program that solves Sudoku puzzles. And to make it even more challenging I decided not to write the program in the popular object-oriented fashion (Java, C++, C#, etc.) or in any of the old-fashioned procedural programming languages (Pascal, C, Basic etc); but in Transact SQL, within SQL Server 2000.

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