Links voor 23 augustus 2018

Je mag tegenwoordig niks meer © Wannes Daemen
We zijn geen racis­ten, we zijn geen vrou­wen­ha­ters. Maar onze gedra­gin­gen en tra­di­ties heb­ben wel racis­ti­sche of vrouw­on­vrien­de­lij­ke kant­jes. Als we dat dur­ven zien, dan zal er onge­twij­feld een en ander ver­an­de­ren aan wat we doen en zeg­gen.

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The Scientists Who Starved to Death Surrounded By Food | Amusing Planet
As the invading German army poured into the city looting and destroying anything of value, a group of Russian botanists holed up inside the vault of the Vavilov Institute of Plant Industry with a precious collection of seeds and edible plants. This collection, containing seeds from nearly 200,000 varieties of plants of which about a quarter was edible, constituted one of the world’s largest repositories of the genetic diversity of food crops. Among them were plenty of rice, wheat, corn, beans and potatoes, enough to sustain the botanists and see them through the worst days of the siege. But the scientists hadn’t barricaded themselves in the vault with food grains to save their lives, but rather to protect these seeds from the Nazis as well as from the starving people plundering through the streets in search for anything to eat.

What Did Ada Lovelace’s Program Actually Do?
Lovelace’s program is often called the world’s first computer program. Not everyone agrees that it should be called that. Lovelace’s legacy, it turns out, is one of computing history’s most hotly debated subjects. Historians have cited all kinds of primary evidence to argue that the credit given to Lovelace is either appropriate or undeserved. But they seem to spend less time explaining the technical details of her published writing, which is unfortunate, because the technical details are the most fascinating part of the story. Who wouldn’t want to know exactly how a program written in 1843 was supposed to work?

PepsiCo Is Acquiring SodaStream for $3.2 Billion | Fortune
PepsiCo has agreed to acquire countertop carbonated water machine maker SodaStream for $3.2 billion—the snacking and beverage giant’s latest move to add healthier products to its portfolio and push a more environmentally friendly agenda.

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